PC Quest: Convegenius and Lenovo launches CG Slate

onveGenius has announced the much-awaited retail launch of CG Slate on Lenovo for Grades K-5. CG Slate is an NCERT curriculum-mapped, self-learning tablet, especially designed for Indian kids in order to make learning fun, yet informative. ConveGenius has partnered with Lenovo to provide world-class hardware, and e-commerce giant, Flipkart, is the online marketplace through which CG Slate will be rolled out in India at INR 8,499 but early Bird Offer for the first 1000 tablets is INR 7499/-

This edutainment (Education and Entertainment) solution was earlier accessible exclusively to ConveGenius’ B2B clients, which include State Governments, large NGOs and learning centers in India, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The product centres around a ‘gamified’ approach to learning, which means that the child feels like he/she is a part of a game, while he/she learns important concepts through videos, interactive books, stories and worksheets, and then gets rewarded based on his/her performance. The product creates an environment that motivates the child to enjoy the process of learning, while helping them stay focused, thus improving retention.

CG Slate has a unique Learn-Play-Shop approach to learning, which incentivises kids to self-learn without adult supervision, as parental controls take over when the kids use the tablet. As children learn more, they get points, which they can redeem to watch cartoons, to play games and then to add their favourite toys to their wishlist, which their parents can buy for them later with attractive cashback linked to his/her performance. Also, the parents, through a root password, can enjoy all the features of a standard Lenovo tablet, which makes CG Slate a premium affordable tablet for the entire family!

There is also an intelligent mascot – Titu, that guides the child throughout the learning process by adaptively recommending educational content based on the child’s learning needs. It is built to be a genius-companion, and an able accomplice to aid the kid’s educational journey.

 

Specifications:

 

PROCESSOR MediaTek® MT8127 1.3GHz Quad-Core™
OPERATING SYSTEM Android™ 5.0 Lollipop
SOUND 1x Front Speaker, Dolby® Audio, 3.5mm Jack
RAM 1 GB
INTERNAL MEMORY 8GB / 16GB eMMC
EXPANDABLE Up to 32GB via microSD
BATTERY 3450mAh, Li-ion
DIMENSIONS 105 mm x 9.3 mm x 189 mm
WEIGHT 269g (0.59 lbs)
SIZE 7.0″ (1024 x 600) IPS, GFM Air bonding
Rear Camera 2MP fixed-focus
Front Camera 0.3MP fixed-focus

Link to the original article posted by PC Quest.

Financial Express: Lenovo launch CG Slate for kids in India

India’s leading Educational Technology Company ConveGenius committed to offering mobile solutions to enhance the quality of education in India announced launch of CG Slate on Lenovo for Grades K-5.

The CG Slate is an NCERT curriculum-mapped, self-learning tablet, especially designed for Indian kids in order to make learning fun, yet informative. ConveGenius has partnered with Lenovo to provide world-class hardware, and e-commerce giant, Flipkart, is the online marketplace through which CG Slate will be rolled out in India at Rs. 8,499.

This edutainment (Education and Entertainment) solution was earlier accessible exclusively to ConveGenius’ B2B clients, which include State Governments, large NGOs and learning centers in India, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

The product centers around a ‘gamified’ approach to learning, which means that the child feels like he/she is a part of a game, while he/she learns important concepts through videos, interactive books, stories and worksheets, and then gets rewarded based on his/her performance.

The product creates an environment that motivates the child to enjoy the process of learning, while helping them stay focused, thus improving retention.

CG Slate has a unique Learn-Play-Shop approach to learning, which incentivises kids to self-learn without adult supervision, as parental controls take over when the kids use the tablet. As children learn more, they get points, which they can redeem to watch cartoons, to play games and then to add their favorite toys to their wish-list, which their parents can buy for them later with attractive cash-backs linked to his/her performance.

Also, the parents, through a root password, can enjoy all the features of a standard Lenovo tablet, which makes CG Slate a premium affordable tablet for the entire family. “We envision CG Slate to be every child’s best friend for Learning, Entertainment, and Shopping.

In this endeavor, we have partnered with best-in-breed brands such as Lenovo and Flipkart to ensure a seamless user and purchase experience, respectively,” said MD ConveGenius Group, Jairaj Bhattacharya. “CG Slate is an affordable and comprehensive mobile learning solution, which uses the immense potential of gamification to personalize learning for kids, and supplements regular curricula taught in school with NCERT-mapped content.

We are positive that CG Slate’s interactive lessons, games, videos, and movies will enrich the overall learning experience of the young generation, and would be a real aid for parents,” added Jairaj Bhattacharya.“Tablet technology has been a game-changer for education since it allows young learners to leverage a touch-screen interface to access a wide variety of digital resources.

Lenovo has always aimed at providing the best devices and technology for education and entertainment and our association with ConveGenius reinforces this commitment in the form of CG Slate,” said Director – Marketing Lenovo India, Bhaskar Choudhuri.

The Lenovo powered education tablet is an ideal device that provides an enriched and comprehensive learning experience for young children.

Link to the original article published by Financial Express. 

 

Indian Express: Lenovo and ConveGenius launch CG Slate tablet for kids

There was a time when games and studies did not go hand in hand. Kids were allowed to play video games/watch television only when they finish their homework. In addition to this, traditional teaching methods only made learning monotonous. But with technology, quality educational content is not only accessible but has become interactive too.

Therefore, to generate interest among kids, educational technology company ConveGenius on Tuesday launched a learning device ‘CG Slate’ – in collaboration with global PC and smartphone maker Lenovo in New Delhi.

The CG Slate is priced at Rs 8,499.

“We did a research and found that kids are happy when they play games, eat lunch and watch TV. But when it comes to studies, they loose interest. Therefore, we integrated entertainment and education to make things engaging in a fun way,” said Jairaj Bhattacharya, Managing Director, ConveGenius Group, New Delhi.

Read: Now a computer game than can help your child learn maths

Through this edutainment method, kids can self-learn without adult supervision. With each level they pass, they’ll get points. With these rewards, they can have a wishlist of toys, et al. Parents can buy these things for them later.

“We’ll send a report card to parents via email on their child’s performance. So, from an early age, parents can keep a tab on what subjects interest their child,” said Bhattacharya.

To help kids deal with obstacles, there is a mascot  – Titu –  a squirrel, which will motivate and help the kids in solving their problems.

The tablet has pre-loaded NCERT curriculum from kindergarten to Class 5.

Since the content is in English, won’t a major section loose interest? “The idea is to bring aspiration value among them. So now learning English will be easier. Our focus is on Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities as the kids in the metro cities already have an access to rich quality content,” said Bhattacharya.

For more news on education, click here

Link to the original article published by Indian Express.

 

India Today: Lenovo, ConveGenius launch CG Slate education-oriented tablet for kids

n a bid to make technology a fun activity for children in India, educational technology company ConveGenius on Tuesday launched a learning device ‘CG Slate’ in collaboration with global PC and smartphone maker Lenovo.

Priced at Rs. 8,499, the product centres around a “gamified” approach to learning where a child engages self through games and learns important concepts through videos, interactive books, stories and worksheets.

“We envision ‘CG Slate’ to be every child’s best friend for learning, entertainment and shopping. In this endeavour, we have partnered with Lenovo and e-tailer Flipkart to ensure a seamless user and purchase experience, respectively,” Jairaj Bhattacharya, Managing Director, ConveGenius Group, told reporters in New Delhi.

The NCERT curriculum-mapped, self-learning tablet, helps create an environment that motivates the child to enjoy the process of learning while helping him or her stay focused.

Also Read: Flipkart delivery boy replaces 12 iPhones with fake ones

“Tablet technology has been a game-changer for education since it allows young learners to leverage a touch-screen interface to access a wide variety of digital resources,” added Bhaskar Choudhuri, Director-Marketing, Lenovo.

With Android 5.0 Lollipop operating system and 1.3GHz quad-core processor, the tablet has 8GB internal storage and 32GB expandable memory along with 1GB RAM. It weighs 269 grams.

The device is now available on e-commerce platform Flipkart.

Link to the original article published by IndiaToday.

BW Business World: The Appification Of Education

Technology and education were always supposed to be ideal bedfellows. Microsoft, and later Apple, showed the world how learning could become the stuff of magic when software or apps could be created to transform the way content is presented. Multimillion dollar productions were ported to disks bringing to life rich visual feasts of science, nature, geography, history and for those who remember, the Encyclopedia Encarta. Even books became interactive, popping out videos, going 360 degrees on images and panning across graphs and figures to zoom into details. But neither did these address the real-life education-related problems of many places, like India, and nor were they affordable to everyone.

Technology and education were always supposed to be ideal bedfellows. Microsoft, and later Apple, showed the world how learning could become the stuff of magic when software or apps could be created to transform the way content is presented. Multimillion dollar productions were ported to disks bringing to life rich visual feasts of science, nature, geography, history and for those who remember, the Encyclopedia Encarta. Even books became interactive, popping out videos, going 360 degrees on images and panning across graphs and figures to zoom into details. But neither did these address the real-life education-related problems of many places, like India, and nor were they affordable to everyone.

Today, this is changing. Startups are jumping into the education segment to cater to the specific needs of students and educators in India — and of course, do what startups do. With the meteoric rise of the use of mobiles, naturally that means the appification of education has begun. And “edtech” is already making a difference.

Helping Hand

It certainly is a life-saver for Umesh, a 23-year-old from Indore who has been furiously busy preparing for the CAT exam. It isn’t easy and, with so much at stake, it’s nerve wracking. But Umesh has a coach at hand, even though he’s studying hard at home. He’s on Prepathon, a three-month-old entrant into the education app space from the PagaLGuY portal — a large MBA resource. The Prepathon app, which has been in the works for the past two years, is free on Android, and helps students prepare for the CAT, JEE, and IBPS examinations. But it doesn’t just throw the content at the users. Its chief executive officer has strong ideas on how education and technology should work.

“Technology has changed everything from healthcare to transportation, but interestingly, it has been able to do nothing for education,” says, Allwin Agnel, founder of PaGaLGuY and Prepathon.“It’s been the same as it always has for the past hundreds of years — you have a teacher and you have a classroom. The only difference in the past few years is that all the content has been digitised. But frankly, this has not really propelled a whole new generation to learn.” Agnel believes that companies try to either put content online, or offer teaching services, or form communities. But never all three. “For any online business to work,” he says, “it has to first replicate offline. Our idea was to put all three together in Prepathon.”

In the app, Prepathon offers the content, particularly daily quizzes, it has the platform for students to get the support of other students in a community, and it has an always-available coach. With these in place, a learner’s progress is tracked, suggestions are given, analysis is done to help overcome weak points and motivate a student to keep at it. The coach can chat with the student to help channel content to the learner and overcome any sign of procrastination.

Prepathon’s quizzes have already been taken 50,000 times by its 100,000 students. There are only five coaches so far, but this number is to be stepped up as the company scales. Prepathon gets its funding from PaGaLGuy at the moment and is free for students though it may move to an affordable but paid model in the future.

Child’s Play
Jairaj Bhattacharya and Shashank Pandey, two IIT graduates, agree entirely with the thought that content alone, even if it’s in digital form, is not enough to make anyone learn. The duo founded a platform they called ConveGenius to bring edutainment to young children because they believe that innovation is missing in this sector. “You cannot guarantee learning by selling content — otherwise it’s just the replacement for a book,” says Pandey.

Singapore- and Noida-based ConvaGenius set out on the gamification route, not tampering with the actual content but linking learning to rewards external to the content. With apps in the works, they built in the software onto tablets. They worked on access to content which they could aggregate and present free. They carried out a pilot on a mix of kids from both government schools and high-end public schools to see what measures could be taken to make a child learn. To add to the intrinsic curiosity of a child they tried to digitally build in a points system to incentivise them to learn. The points could be traded in for various treats, from play time to ice-cream.

Funding
ConveGenius has just received a modest sum of Rs 2 crore in pre-series A funding. The company did not reveal the source of their educational content but does reach out to an initial base of 50,000 students in the primary school category. They plan to scale to address higher grades as well and launch their app on mobiles.

Neither students nor educators have the time to sit at desktops for long periods of time, looking at learning resources or solving problems. Just like everything else, education too has to be mobile-first and all about communication. It was with this in mind that Flinnt was founded. “The need for people to share resources and collaborate on the go is absolutely felt,” says Harish Iyer, founder and CEO of the Flinnt platform.

The app itself has no content but is a messenger in which faculties of institutes and students and create categories. “It’s just like a set of Facebook posts in which you can discuss certain subjects of academic interest,” said Iyer, “It’s just that the faculty has control over posts, who comments, and can moderate and delete comments if they are inappropriate. It’s a structured social learning environment that we provide to institutions.” Links to resources, questions and discussions can take place on Flinnt.

The control and focus isn’t possible on public messengers like Whatsapp. The institution subscribes the Flinnt app at a fee of Rs 15,000 per year, and then the students and teachers can then download the app free for up to 5,000 individuals per institution. Both schools and higher educational institutes use Flinnt including for parent-teacher communication.

There are several other apps spanning the categories of content, tests, and collaboration, specially catering to K-12 learning. Tata ClassEdge is an example and it enables teachers to deliver high-quality content to spark learners’ curiosity, critical thinking and other intellectual skills. Many apps are purely content related and focus on delivering instruction in a mobile format. Duolingo — the language learning app that has become very popular globally — is an example.

The heartening thing is that many of the startups involved in edtech are looking at reaching remote areas with their offerings. But like all startups, the challenge will be to manage the technology when scaling and finding a sustainable source of revenue that ensures a future beyond burning through funding.

Click here to read the original article published by BW Business World.

Lick to the original article published by BW business world. 

 

MyVenture.in: This edutainment startup makes the learning process both fun and rewarding

ABOUT CONVEGENIUS

We all live under the same sky. However, we all don’t have the same horizon. The whole world we live in becomes an abode of absolute bliss if we all stay knowledgeable. To gain a legitimate position of knowledge, eternity and bliss, one needs to have a conditioned consciousness. ConveGenius  , launched in April 2013, does its best to inculcate the so called ‘conditioned consciousness’ among its target audiences. It aims to create products that can foster significant school of thoughts in the knowledge and education space. Its products Battle of Minds and CG-Slate are self-explanatory and affordable solutions for learning. ConveGenius  amalgamates learning with fun and rewards to create powerful eco-systems for longer engagement via gamification experiences.

GENESIS OF  “CONVEGENIUS”

Here is an intriguing account on the genesis of the appellation ‘ConveGenius’- ConveGenius is a combination of the words ‘Convergence‘ and ‘Genius‘, the idea was to brand the company name by what core value it intends to create through its products. As a matter of fact, ConveGenius designs its products for giving learners an opportunity to access infinite knowledge and learn while they have fun, thereby converging and tending towards being smarter. Further, the ‘i‘ in Genius was initially projected to showcase – innovation and information transfer, both of them being the core foundations of the company.

*

Initially, embarking on this journey seemed unthinkable and impossible. Eventually, the unthinkable happened. The difference between possible and impossible lies in a person’s determination. Jairaj Bhattacharya, is a determined personality. To taste success, one must channelize his efforts religiously and diligently. Jairaj spends around 9 productive hours/per day to realize his venture’s vision. Sometimes, he spends an overwhelming 18 hours per day. He is complimented by his core team members in every sphere of work. They work relentlessly sans any break, not even on Sundays. This clearly bespeaks their workaholic nature.

FOUNDING MEMBERS AND TEAM SIZE

Team

Jairaj Bhattacharya and Shashank Pandey, the founders of ConveGenius were involved in reviewing Aakash tablet for IEEE as a research project during their final year at IIIT Hyderabad.
ConveGenius management team comprises of alumnus of IIIT Hyderabad, IIIT Allahabad, IIT Bombay and NTU Singapore. The overall team size currently is 26.

Most of the countless philosophers, triumphant people and candid entrepreneurs never had an easy start. Not astonishingly, Jairaj Bhattacharya’s journey is also riddled with umpteen challenges. Here is an excerpt from his insightful conversation with MyVenture, “I have had many learning experiences in my journey as an entrepreneur and the journey so far has been extremely satisfying professionally. Key decisions in the company have always revolved around priorities and focus on the long-term goals be it investors, partners, team members or the kind of product we are building in general. We make decisions at every point thinking if the decision we are making today would have positive or negative repercussions 2 years down the line, irrespective of whatever short term benefit the deal is currently bringing today. Sometimes, it had been very difficult to reject enticing offers that made sense in the short term but sticking to our vision is what we have learnt through such experiences.”

FUTURE GOALS AND VISION

Talking about ConveGenius’s vision and mission, Jairaj  said, “We believe that smartphones will reach children and parents across India and other developing countries much faster than good infrastructure for schools, access to quality teachers and the availability of books. There will be a projected 650 million smart phones in India by 2018. We are trying to bring the power to learn on the smart-phone at the access of a fingertip, all this is completely free for the end user.”

KEY ADVICE TO YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS

It has been proved time and again in countless incidents that perseverance is the key to success. On a similar note, Jairaj Bhattacharya advices young entrepreneurs to persevere in their dreams. Here is his advice to all entrepreneurs, “My biggest advice to young entrepreneurs is to always focus on the problem you are solving. Get obsessed about it, and always keep thinking and learning, never become complacent or satisfied, stay greedy about it. There is always a better solution and as long as you are on your finger tips to learn and keep innovating, half the problem gets solved. Entrepreneurship is all about creating value by solving problems. Never think about money while you are doing that, keep adapting and changing with how competition and technologies are evolving.”

One needs to have the drive to face challenges and move forward in life. Inculcate the virtue of cultivating a strong will power to achieve the impossible. Team MyVenture expresses its profound and wholehearted wishes to all determined people!

Link to the original article published by MyVenture.in.

Times Of India- Textbooks@click: Paperless future of education

Expensive private schools took to them a while ago, but the tablet is now making digital inroads into smaller schools, government vidyalayas, and even model anganwadis. But sceptics are not yet ready to write off paper.

Do the students of the (MES) International School at Pattambi in north Kerala miss the joys of opening a stiff new notebook? The pleasures of slitting open uncut textbook pages? In their second year of using tablets as the school-given replacement to text- and notebooks, the thrill of summoning a new pixelated page is still fresh, and such losses are not yet felt.
The phenomenon of the ‘tablet as textbook’ is gradually gaining school ground, and although it has covered only a handful of the 1.5 million schools in India, its proponents are selling it as the ‘paperless’ future of education.
Redeemed from the 5-kg backpack, 800 7th to 12th graders at MES go to school armed only with a 720g tablet and a few notebooks. Another 800 middle schoolers are set to join their ramrod ranks next year. The Rs 19,000 given to them (with EMI options) are preloaded with dictionaries and curriculum-specific course material that’s animated, hyperlinked and interactive. Within school premises, students latch on to the institution’s secure intranet and at home, have controlled access to the web from where they download NCERT textbooks in PDF.

“It’s the democratization of access to study material,” maintains Atul Kulshrestha, founder of Extramarks, the edutech company that has turned MES and five other schools ‘paperless’. A teacher’s notes on the digital whiteboard are automatically saved on the tabs via WiFi.
“Each school’s course material (for CBSE, ICSE and four other state boards) is developed by our content creators in conjunction with its school teachers,” says Kulshrestha, whose tabs communicate in Hindi and English. The often self-explanatory course notes apparently quickens the work of teachers, who can keep tabs on the tabs, with direct access to a student’s homework and tests.
The shift to tablets and apps not only marks a shift in pedagogical practice, but also an evolution in learning behaviour. Says Navaneeth Shashikumar, a tenth grader at MES: “The audio-visual material is easy to comprehend. For example if we are learning about the functioning of the heart in biology, we can access references outside the syllabus on the tab.” He adds that 2-D textbook diagrams now come alive with depth and movement. “We can highlight important sections in the text and refer to them later. Difficult words are easy to look up in the embedded dictionary. Revision is also easier as the day’s lessons can be recalled with a click.”
Paper cut: Teaching via the tab at the Muslim Education Society International School at Pattambi, Kerala.
A Technopak report says 12.5% of Indian schools have digital classrooms, and estimates the current market size as $1b. Apart from mid-tier schools, the tab is also being deployed free of cost in civic and aided schools, and even anganwadis. The Shiv Sena-helmed BMC in Mumbai has started dispensing tabs in the city’s civic schools – the Rs 300 crore project has already run into a controversy with allegations of nepotism. And Kerala is due to kickstart a kindred IT@School project. Tablets have also been working to draw students to 66 state ‘adarsh’ anganwadis in Chhindwara, Madhya Pradesh.
Manufactured by ConveGenius, a Noida-based edutainment startup, the Rs 6,000 CGSlate, sponsored by the local zilla parishads, has helped children aged 3-5 years grasp the fundaments of Hindi, English, Maths and personal care through reward-based interactive games, songs and rhymes. Amita Singh, the anganwaadi supervisor of the villages of Nagalwadi, Bijorigumai and Khirsadoh, says the pre-primary section’s strength rose from 12 to 28 after the tabs entered class – word got around the village that ‘computers’ were being used to teach children.
“If a child took 10 days to learn a rhyme with a teacher, a couple of viewings of the animated video now has them picking it up in a couple,” says Singh, adding that the kindergartens now rely on the devices, not books. The tabs are especially useful when teachers themselves have a poor handle on the subject, she notes.
Companies like ConveGenius are following Ola’s modus operandi and aggregating content from third-party content creators. Kulshrestha, who developes his own content, says, “By curating online resources, we take a child exactly where she needs to go for supplementary information so she doesn’t have to hunt the Internet for it. On the other hand, free online resources like Khan Academy are West-centric.”
But critics point to the downside. “Tablets are okay as supplementary tools for research, but they shouldn’t replace textbooks,” says Sushant Kalra, director, Parwarish Institute of Parenting, a Delhi consultancy that focuses on parenting and education. “Kids are losing touch with the real world as it is. If you also place their education on tablets, it will further affect their real-world interactions and health.”
Another cautionary voice comes from Navneet Publications, whose stationary, reference guides and prep tests have long been part of education. They too have entered the digital fray with eSense, a subsidiary that provides class ebooksof its print portfolio as well as pre-filled tablets, but its MD Sunil Gala is not writing off paper just yet. “Not everyone in education is convinced of its comparative benefits,” he says, adding that no school that claims to be ‘paperless’ is actually 100% paper-free because some amount of writing, geometry and drawing will always be done by hand. Exams, after all, are handwritten.
The annual curriculum updates on a tab are made by changing a device’s SD card, which could cost Rs 1,500 to Rs 2,000, depending on the grade. “A fifth grader may spend Rs 1,700 on new notebooks, guides and textbooks every year,” says Gala. An SD card plus the extra outlay of Rs 500 on stationary, does make tabs seem the more expensive option, not to mention repair costs if the child damages the tab.
This year, Navneet supplied tablets to 15 government-aided Marathi-medium schools in Maharashtra. The tabs come with a class of state textbooks and interactive eBooks of its supplementary resources. “But it’s a costly proposition to replace textbooks with tablets, and since most schools in India aim to be affordable, who will bear these expenses?” Gala asks.

Link to the original article published by TOI.

Gadgets 360: Lenovo CG Slate tablet launched for kids

In a bid to make technology a fun activity for children in India, educational technology company ConveGenius on Tuesday launched a learning device ‘CG Slate‘ in collaboration with global PC and smartphone maker Lenovo.

Priced at Rs. 8,499, the product centres around a “gamified” approach to learning where a child engages self through games and learns important concepts through videos, interactive books, stories and worksheets.

“We envision ‘CG Slate’ to be every child’s best friend for learning, entertainment and shopping. In this endeavour, we have partnered with Lenovo and e-tailer Flipkart to ensure a seamless user and purchase experience, respectively,” Jairaj Bhattacharya, Managing Director, ConveGenius Group, told reporters in New Delhi.

The NCERT curriculum-mapped, self-learning tablet, helps create an environment that motivates the child to enjoy the process of learning while helping him or her stay focused.

“Tablet technology has been a game-changer for education since it allows young learners to leverage a touch-screen interface to access a wide variety of digital resources,” added Bhaskar Choudhuri, Director-Marketing, Lenovo.

With Android 5.0 Lollipop operating system and 1.3GHz quad-core processor, the tablet has 8GB internal storage and 32GB expandable memory along with 1GB RAM. It weighs 269 grams.

The device is now available on e-commerce platform Flipkart.

Link to the original article published by gadgets 360. 

Gadgets Now: Lenovo and Convegenius launch CG Slate Tablet for kids

EW DELHI: Lenovo has joined hands with Convegenius, an educational technology company, to launch CG Slate tablet priced at Rs 8,499. The tablet will be sold exclusively on Flipkart. The e-commerce giant is also offering a Rs 1,000 early bird discount on the tablet.

The CG Slate, as described by the company, is an NCERT curriculum-mapped, self-learning tablet for kids. The device was previously only limited to Convegenius’ B2B clients, which are State Governments, NGOs and other learning centres. It has been mentioned that the tablet is centred around a ‘gamified’ approach to learning, meaning that kids would be gaining knowledge by playing games. As kids learn more, they receive points, which can be redeemed to watch cartoons, play games and more. Kids can also be able to choose toys, which can be later purchased by parents using cash backs linked to the child’s account.

Lenovo Ideapad Y700 laptop launched at Rs 99,990

The Lenovo-made CG Slate tablet runs Android 5.0 Lollipop out-of-the-box and features a 7-inch WSVGA IPS display with 1024×600 pixels. It is powered by a quad-core MediaTek MT8127 processor, clubbed with 1GB RAM. Also included is an 8GB of inbuilt storage, which can be expanded via a microSD card up to 32GB.

On the camera front, the CG Slate tablet houses 2MP rear camera along with a 0.3MP front-facing camera. It is backed by a 3450mAh battery and weighs 105×9.3x189mm.

As per the company, the CG Slate tablet also has a mascot called Titu. The friendly character guides kids throughout the learning process, recommending content based on the kids’s learning needs.

“CG Slate is an affordable and comprehensive mobile learning solution, which uses the immense potential of gamification to personalise learning for kids, and supplements regular curricula taught in school with NCERT-mapped content. We are positive that CG Slate’s interactive lessons, games, videos and movies will enrich the overall learning experience of the young generation, and would be a real aid for parents,” said Jairaj Bhattacharya, MD, Convegenius Group during the launch of the tablet.

Link to the original article published by Gadgets Now.

VCCircle: Edutainment startup ConveGenius rewards students for finishing homework on time, targets 3M users by FY17

Wouldn’t it be great if your child were to get a discount on his/her favourite toy for finishing homework on time?
The Noida-based Convegenius Edusolutions Pvt Ltd, which owns and operates digital education startup ConveGenius, is offering something on similar lines.</p>
The company, which brings in elements of entertainment and associated rewards on its apps and mobile games, claims that about 6000 students use its tablet based-edutainment solution CG-Slate for an average of 15 minutes per day. ConveGenius aims to have three million kids on its platform by FY17, Shashank Pandey, co-founder of the company told Techcircle.
The CG-Slate interface provides features such as independence from the use of internet connection, easy distribution of content using SD cards, customised regional language integration, simple analytic report collection and teacher-student communication. It has the option of smart scribbles to maintain hand-written notes.
“We are working with few kids-focused e-commerce portals as well as gaming firms. Our customers include rural as well urban households,” said Pandey.</p>
The idea is that the e-commerce portals will dish out discounts for kids to finish an academic assignment on time. Or for that matter, the gaming firm partnership would would allow children to play one more level of their favourite games on meeting their academic targets.
The company says that CG-Slate envisages the integration of low-cost hardware (as was intended by government’s Aakash tablet project) and software focused ecosystem to help kids learn in fun way.

Click here to read the original article published by VCCircle